Four further selections for the Free Black Women’s Library reading challenge

14. A book released last year. Spill: Fugitive Scenes by Alexis Pauline Gumbs.

Alexis Pauline Gumbs is an African American poet, artist, and educator, who has previously edited a collection of essays focused on women of colour and other marginalised mothers, Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Frontlines. Spill: Fugitive Scenes is an experimental and unusual piece. An interactive text, in dialogue with Hortense Spillers, another Black woman writer I’d not heard of and whose work I am now keen to read.

‘before black is bad and broken i am more. i am not coin or token. i am deepest spell spoken. and you are shook. i am the energy of birth that you took. i am every blackened letter pressing on the book. and before that.’

15. A Caribbean author. Pepper Seed by Malika Booker.

Malika Booker is a Guyanese-Grenadian poet. I came across this collection of poetry, Pepper Seed, when it was reviewed by Didi of Brown Girl Reading. These poems are infused with Caribbean history and culture, redolent with ancestral voices and the search for belonging.

I stand at this cliff’s edge waiting for the bones

to rise and reclaim their names.

16. A book by Toni Morrison. Song of Solomon.

Since reading Beloved I’ve been gradually reading each of Morrison’s novels. The next on my list was Song of Solomon, one I’ve been very much looking forward to reading and like each of her other novels I was enthralled by the deftness with which Morrison writes; her work is stunningly brilliant.

‘She needed what most colored girls needed: a chorus of mamas, grandmamas, aunts, cousins, sisters, neighbours, Sunday school teachers, best girl friends, and what all to give her the strength life demanded of her.’

17. Self help type text. Every Body Yoga: let go of fear, get on the mat, love your body by Jessamyn Stanley.

Jessamyn Stanley is a yoga teacher whom I’ve been following on instagram for some time and was excited to learn that she would be publishing this book. Every Body Yoga is part memoir part motivational text part yoga workbook. As my own yoga practice has been fallow for a long while I consider this book to be ‘self-help’ in the sense that i need all the help i can get to bring myself back to the mat and reestablish a home practice. Jessamyn’s writing is frank direct and unpretentious. Her accessible and inclusive teaching style is reflected in the accompanying photographs and illustrations. The sequences that i’m practicing include i want to feel strong, i need to feel balanced, i need to release fear. Gentle, refreshing, uplifting.

3 further selections for the Free Black Women’s Library reading challenge

11. A novel by Octavia Butler. Kindred.

I began reading Kindred with high expectations having not read any of her novels before and having heard such positive recommendations. Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy this book at all, partially this is explained by the descriptions of violence, these being difficult to stomach for good reason, but I also didn’t find myself emotionally engaging with the characters. Most particularly, the protagonist’s continual excusing of the slave holder’s brutality, her repeated attempts to persuade the object of his worst sadistic impulses into expressions of acceptance and love towards him, as well as her revulsion at his selling of enslaved people but not at his ownership of them all seemed incongruous to me. Why should Alice be exhorted to exhibit care towards the man abusing her? (and by a ‘modern’ woman?) What purpose does the pressure towards inculcating her in complicity serve in the narrative of the novel? This book has left me with questions to ponder, and I will read some more of Octavia’s work in future to see if it illuminates.

12. A play. for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf by Ntozake Shange.

I knew immediately that for this selection I wanted to read Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls, and found this copy from my library, which contains three of her plays, Spell #7 and The Love Space Demands as well as for coloured girls. All three are life-giving, incisive and bold. Ntozake Shange’s works are landmarks in the inscription of Black women’s experiences; unmissably brilliant, her use of language is defiant yet grounded, quickening and brave. This collection spoke to my heart in ways no other play I’ve read ever has.

i want my own things/ how i lived them/ & give me my memories/ how i waz when i waz there/ you can’t have them or do nothin wit them/ stealin my shit from me/ dont make it yrs/ makes it stolen/

13. Short stories. What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi.

This pick is in addition to the poetry section, which although given as an either/or selection I decided to pick one of each. This is a collection of stories from an author, Helen Oyeyemi, I’ve been wanting to read for some time. I was drawn by the title, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, but underwhelmed by the stories themselves. Short stories are not a form that I tend to enjoy (one remarkable exception to this being The Thing Around Your Neck by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, which amazed me). Since reading this, I’ve gone on to read The Icarus Girl, which deals with some similar themes, mental illness, obsession, and I was sadly not taken by this either. Boy, Snow Bird is next on my reading list so I will continue to see if I can find a way into greater appreciation for Oyeyemi’s work.

 

You can find out more about the Free Black Woman’s Library and the reading challenge here: thefreeblackwomanslibrary.tumblr.com

Bibliophile World: May Book Challenge

For the month of May I’m participating the the bibliophile world photo challenge. The first post, simply a TBR. I have stubbled upon a few books whilst browsing my local library shelves. I Love Dick by Chris Kraus; Brooklyn Heights by Miral al-Tahawy; The Earthsea Quartet by Ursula le Guin; My Father’s Daughter by Hannah Pool; The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma; Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi.

The second is an anticipated read getting published this month. This is another concept that has been introduced to me through bookstagram: knowing months in advance when a book is going to be published and anticipating it’s release. I think this may be derived from young adult series fiction, when understandably readers await the next instalment in a trilogy, quartet, etc. It’s been a while since I was young enough to engage in this delicious type of anticipatory excitement; unfortunately I am awaiting no new releases, my TBR consists largely of books I ought to have read some time ago, having been published in most cases for many years.

The third photo, a bookish rainbow, was a light hearted joy to construct. I’m in the process of reorganising my books having recently moved house and it was fun to play amongst my bookshelves, although I was truck by how lacking in colour my book spines are, having faded from too long in the sun, or simply been bound in muted colours to begin with.

Fourth, a recommendation. Recently read, The Algebra of Infinite Justice by Arundhati Roy. Her work bringing to wider notice the realities of neo-liberalism is immensely important and more timely now than ever.

Finally for today’s post, a quick read, The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros, is a short yet fulsome novel told from an adolescent perspective, with wisdom and pathos.

I’m enjoying this little challenge and the way it has brought me to a more lively interaction with my reading, old and new, bought and borrowed. I’ll be updating my progress later in the month.