3 further selections for the Free Black Women’s Library reading challenge

11. A novel by Octavia Butler. Kindred.

I began reading Kindred with high expectations having not read any of her novels before and having heard such positive recommendations. Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy this book at all, partially this is explained by the descriptions of violence, these being difficult to stomach for good reason, but I also didn’t find myself emotionally engaging with the characters. Most particularly, the protagonist’s continual excusing of the slave holder’s brutality, her repeated attempts to persuade the object of his worst sadistic impulses into expressions of acceptance and love towards him, as well as her revulsion at his selling of enslaved people but not at his ownership of them all seemed incongruous to me. Why should Alice be exhorted to exhibit care towards the man abusing her? (and by a ‘modern’ woman?) What purpose does the pressure towards inculcating her in complicity serve in the narrative of the novel? This book has left me with questions to ponder, and I will read some more of Octavia’s work in future to see if it illuminates.

12. A play. for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf by Ntozake Shange.

I knew immediately that for this selection I wanted to read Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls, and found this copy from my library, which contains three of her plays, Spell #7 and The Love Space Demands as well as for coloured girls. All three are life-giving, incisive and bold. Ntozake Shange’s works are landmarks in the inscription of Black women’s experiences; unmissably brilliant, her use of language is defiant yet grounded, quickening and brave. This collection spoke to my heart in ways no other play I’ve read ever has.

i want my own things/ how i lived them/ & give me my memories/ how i waz when i waz there/ you can’t have them or do nothin wit them/ stealin my shit from me/ dont make it yrs/ makes it stolen/

13. Short stories. What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi.

This pick is in addition to the poetry section, which although given as an either/or selection I decided to pick one of each. This is a collection of stories from an author, Helen Oyeyemi, I’ve been wanting to read for some time. I was drawn by the title, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, but underwhelmed by the stories themselves. Short stories are not a form that I tend to enjoy (one remarkable exception to this being The Thing Around Your Neck by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, which amazed me). Since reading this, I’ve gone on to read The Icarus Girl, which deals with some similar themes, mental illness, obsession, and I was sadly not taken by this either. Boy, Snow Bird is next on my reading list so I will continue to see if I can find a way into greater appreciation for Oyeyemi’s work.

 

You can find out more about the Free Black Woman’s Library and the reading challenge here: thefreeblackwomanslibrary.tumblr.com

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